Correlational Study of Culturally-Based Instructional Strategy and Cognitive Competencies on Problem Solving, Speaking and Listening: An Evidence in Oyo State Nigeria

Authors

  • Oluyemisi Majebi Early Childhood and Educational Foundations
  • Esther Oduolowu University of Ibadan,

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31098/ijeiece.v3i2.564

Abstract

The study examined the impact of culturally based Instructional strategy (indigenous songs, rhymes, games, stories, language of the immediate environment and instructional materials) on pre-primary school children’s cognitive competence with special attention to problem-solving, speaking and listening skills. Socio-cultural theory provided the framework, while pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design was adopted. 74 children (44 males and 30 females) with a mean age of 5.61 from four pre-primary schools (two public and private schools) were purposively selected from two local government areas, and randomised into CIBS and conventional groups respectively. Children’s Cognitive Competence Rating Scale (r = 0.89) and CBIS Instructional Guide were used to collect the study data. Paired sample t-test and Analysis of covariance(ANCOVA) were used to analyse the data. There was a significant main effect of treatment on children’s cognitive competence (F(1,65) = 10.31; partial ?2 = 0.14). CIBS was found to be potent in enhancing pre-primary school children’s cognitive competence, especially in problem-solving, speaking, and listening skills. Teaching and learning activities at the pre-primary school level should employ a culturally-based instructional strategy.

 

Author Biography

Esther Oduolowu, University of Ibadan,

Professor

Department of Early Childhood and Educational Foundations

Faculty of Education,

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Published

2021-11-30

How to Cite

Majebi, O., & Oduolowu, E. (2021). Correlational Study of Culturally-Based Instructional Strategy and Cognitive Competencies on Problem Solving, Speaking and Listening: An Evidence in Oyo State Nigeria. International Journal of Emerging Issues in Early Childhood Education, 3(2), 28–41. https://doi.org/10.31098/ijeiece.v3i2.564

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Articles